I received a rightfully concerned email from a group asking if I was the one that made the newegg purchase referenced in the email. The email (as displayed in my text mail program) looked like this:

    From: NewEgg Support
    To: info@xxxxx.org
    ReplyTo: lackey@deadbeats.com
    Sent: Jun 5, 2008 3:20 PM
    Subject: You order in process!

    Good day, info!

    Thanks for you order!
    ASUS 20X DVDąR DVD Burner with LightScribe Black SATA Model DRW-2014L1T - Retail $919.45

    You can check order status at the folowing link:
    http://www.newegg.com/mi?l=I6WC70R53692IL9KF74YV52213EL9N975LD3QS <http://www.newegg.com.id130UOZ27719H368VP0.102354124.cn/sen/index.php>

    Best regards,
    Support NewEgg.

My response via email got canned as spam. Sigh. So here it is via the web:

    I think this is an email scam.

    The link in the email that you forwarded is:

    http://www.newegg.com/mi?l=I6WC70R53692IL9KF74YV52213EL9N975LD3QS
    +<http://www.newegg.com.id130UOZ27719H368VP0.102354124.cn/sen/index.php>

    The first part looks like a legit newegg.com URL. The second part (in angle
    brackets) is typically the part that you will be re-directed to if you click
    on the link. It specifies a different server:

    http://www.newegg.com.id130UOZ27719H368VP0.102354124.cn

    The .cn top level domain belongs to china. If you go to that page, it
    redirects you to a different page:

    http://106384234523.cn/ulp/check.php

    That pages displays nothing (but, based on the name, might record the details
    of your IP address or browser).

    The web page http://106384234523.cn seems to belong to a consulting firm.

    I would suggest calling newegg.com to report the email and to ensure that
    nothing was actually billed - but the whole things seems pretty fishy to me.

    Jamie